The 5 biggest Virtual and Augmented Reality Trends For 2020 Everyone Should know.

2019 was a growth year for VR and AR. However, 2020 will start a revolutionary decade! with global spending on XR technology is forecast to increase by 78.5% next year compared to this year, both technologies will be key trends to watch out for in 2020. We are anticipating seeing a whole load of exciting new hardware offering even greater immersion and realism, as well as innovative use cases as industry gets to grips with what it can do. So how can this year revolutionize the AR and VR technology?

Destination: the Future of AR, VR and AI

1. Industrial use outtakes Gaming and Entertainment

Researches have showed that the development of t of enterprise XR solutions is overtaking that on consumer solutions. VR can be used to simulate working in dangerous environments or with expensive, easily damaged tools and equipment, without any of the risks. AR, on the other hand, can be used to relay essential information directly to the user about whatever happens to be in front of them – reducing the time spent by engineers, technicians, or maintenance staff referring to manuals and looking up information online while on the job.

2. XR takes over Healthcare

The potential uses for these technologies in healthcare are obvious, and over 2020 we can expect to see many of these use cases transition from trials and pilots and gradually into general use. Virtual reality has already been adopted in therapy, where it is used to treat patients with phobias and anxiety disorders.

3. Headsets get smaller, more mobile and more powerful!

One of the biggest limiting factors with current XR technology is the need for encumbering headsets and display units. This is more of a problem with VR, where the powerful processing hardware needed to generate the graphics is usually contained within the headset. However, hardware devices have started to trend towards being “untethered” – For example, Facebook’s Oculus headset initially needed to be connected to a powerful PC, but this year became available as the self-contained Oculus Quest version.

4. 5G opens new possibilities for VR and AR

One of the biggest limiting factors with current XR technology is the need for encumbering headsets and display units. This is more of a problem with VR, where the powerful processing hardware needed to generate the graphics is usually contained within the headset. However, hardware devices have started to trend towards being “untethered” – For example, Facebook’s Oculus headset initially needed to be connected to a powerful PC, but this year became available as the self-contained Oculus Quest version.

5. More of us will learn through AR and VR

The immersive nature of VR means that pupils can engage with learning in fun new ways, and AR brings new flexibility to on-the-job training. Distance learners could be taught in VR classrooms, meaning they don’t miss out on the benefits of learning in a collaborative environment, while AR training aids can ensure that access to the information needed to carry out a job is always on hand. 

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